"All the world's a stage we pass through." - R. Ayana

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Cars That Run on Air - Right Now

Cars That Run on Air - Right Now
 No news is no free press

tata motors, car, air-power, wind, power, air powered car, air car, Tata MDI, air compressor, zero emissions, zero pollution motors 

Odds are you've never heard of this car.
Why not?

Why is a French company developing it with zero help from the high rolling US-UK dominated global financial system which until recently had money for every loony scheme imaginable?

Answer: The banking system and the oil industry are closely intertwined and they want to protect their investment in the gasoline infrastructure at all costs.


Fortunately, France doesn't have the same commitment to gasoline as fuel that the US and UK does.

France does have oil companies, but it doesn't have the equivalent of Exxon or Royal Dutch Shell.

India doesn't either.

But the French and the Indians do have superb engineers.

Assuming that the collapse of the global financial system doesn't derail the launch of this car, India and France will have vehicles that are completely independent of the oil companies.

No toxic fuel, no toxic emissions, super low cost, utter reliability, and here's the really cool part: the "fuel" could be available anywhere there is room for an air compressor including your own home.

What's not to like about this? Why is the news of this technology all but banned in the US?

The banking system and the oil industry (and news media industry) are closely intertwined.

It's really that simple.



 from http://brasschecktv.com/page/456.html (where you can watch a video)

Two Cylinder Air-Compression Engine



Zero Pollution Motors is also working  on a hybrid version of their engine that can run on traditional fuel in combination with air. The change of energy source is controlled electronically. When the car is moving at speeds below 60 kph, it runs on air. At higher speeds, it runs on a fuel, such as gasoline, diesel or natural gas.

Quiz Corner

How much do you know about engines and what they do? Test your knowledge with our Engine Quiz!

Air tanks fixed to the underside of the vehicle can hold about 79 gallons (300 liters) of air. This compressed air can fuel the e.Volution for up to 124 miles (200 km) at a top speed of 60 miles per hour (96.5 kph). When your tank nears empty, you can just pull over and fill the e.Volution up at the nearest air pump. Using a household electrical source, it takes about four hours to refill the compressed air tanks. However, a rapid three-minute recharge is possible, using a high-pressure air pump.

The car's motor does require a small amount of oil, about .8 liters worth that the driver will have to change just every 31,000 miles (50,000 km). The vehicle will be equipped with an automatic transmission, rear wheel drive, rack and pinion steering and a 9.5 foot (2.89 m) wheel base. It will weigh about 1,543 pounds (700 kg) and will be about 12.5 feet (3.81 m) long, 5.7 feet (1.74 m) tall, and 5.6 feet (1.71 m) wide.

In October, the e.Volution made its public debut in Johannesburg, South Africa, at the Auto Africa Expo 2000. Zero Pollution said that the car will go on sale in South Africa in 2002, but didn't say when the car would be available in other parts of the world.




Cryogenic Heat Engine

 

Another version of an air-powered car is being developed by researchers at the University of Washington using the concept of a steam engine, except there is no combustion. The Washington researchers use liquid nitrogen as the propellant for their LN2000 prototype air car. The researchers decided to use nitrogen because of its abundance in the atmosphere -- nitrogen makes up about 78 percent of the Earth's atmosphere -- and the availablity of liquid nitrogen. There are five components to the LN2000 engine:

A 24-gallon stainless steel tank.

A pump that moves the liquid nitrogen to the economizer.

An economizer that heats the liquid nitrogen with leftover exhaust heat.
A heat exchanger that boils the liquid nitrogen, creating a high pressure gas.
An expander, which converts nitrogen's energy into usable power.

The liquid nitrogen, stored at -320 degrees Fahrenheit (-196 degrees Celsius), is vaporized by the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is the heart of the LN2000's cryogenic engine, which gets its name from the extremely cold temperature at which the liquid nitrogen is stored. Air moving around the vehicle is used to heat the liquid nitrogen to a boil. Once the liquid nitrogen boils, it turns to gas in the same way that heated water forms steam in a steam engine.

Nitrogen gas formed in the heat exchanger expands to about 700 times the volume of its liquid form. This highly pressurized gas is then fed to the expander, where the force of the nitrogen gas is converted into mechanical power by pushing on the engine's pistons. The only exhaust is nitrogen, and since nitrogen is a major part of the atmosphere, the car gives off little pollution. However, the cars may not reduce pollution as much as you think. While no pollution exits the car, the pollution may be shifted to another location. As with the e.Volution car, the LN2000 requires electricity to compress the air. That use of electricity means there is some amount of pollution produced somewhere else.

Some of the leftover heat in the engine's exhaust is cycled back through the engine to the economizer, which preheats the nitrogen before it enters the heat exchanger, increasing efficiency. Two fans at the rear of the vehicle draw in air through the heat exchanger to enhance the transfer of heat to the liquid nitrogen.

The Washington researchers have developed a crude prototype of their car, using a converted 1984 Grumman-Olson Kubvan mail truck. The truck has a radial five-cylinder that produces 15 horsepower with the liquid nitrogen fuel. It also features a five-speed manual transmission. Currently, the vehicle is able to go only about two miles (3.2 km) on a full tank of liquid nitrogen, and its top speed is only 22 mph (35.4 kph). However, because a liquid nitrogen-propelled car will be lighter, the researchers think that a 60-gallon (227 liters) tank will give the LN2000 a potential range of about 200 miles (321.8 km).

With gas prices soaring, as they have over the past two years, it might not be long before many motorists turn to vehicles powered by alternative fuels. Although air-powered vehicles are still behind their gasoline counterparts when it comes to power and performance, they cost less to operate and are arguably more environmentally friendly, which makes them attractive as the future of highway transportation.


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